wyld_dandelyon: (Default)
Yeah, the con report is a little late. Such is life.

I got to the hotel later than planned (the dentist trip the day before slowed me down), and piled the stuff I would need to teach people painting in the Midwinter Faire onto the little luggage cart I mostly use to take a few of my many instruments to filks, got to the usual area only to see no evidence of that event happening. Well, I thought, maybe they moved it. After a quick walk to programming ops, I found that they'd cancelled the event (too bad they didn't tell me, I would have brought less painting stuff). I also found that they were looking for people to add to several panels I was very interested in, one of which started immediately, so I took my paints and canvasses and spare paper and table cover and all to that room to talk about the allegation that there are only 7 stories (well, seven plot types, as it turned out). It was an interesting panel, and I did some sketching underneath my notes for the panel.



It turns out my in-panel doodles are much better when I expected to spend that time teaching art than they are when I am gearing up my thoughts to talking about writing, though I think I held my own on that front too.

Afterward, the art show found me space to hang some art (in addition to the Capricon Challenge piece) and I did that. This pic was taken before they printed the bid sheets.



The next morning, I got up very early (for me) to talk about Libraries in Space--or more specifically about what a library of a new colony on Mars would be like. That sounds like a planetary library to me, but that didn't make the topic any less interesting.

The final panel I was on was Theology in SF, which was fascinating. It was very different from the other excellent religion in SF panels I've been on at various cons in past years, which was due, partially, to the focus on deity rather than religion. I think it was also partially due to the fact that the panelists this time were primarily people fascinated by the study of religion, rather than primarily people who write science fiction--not that the two are in any way exclusive, because they're not, but the focus was more on views of God or Gods and how that affected various science fiction works, and less on how to make a fictional religion believable. I enjoyed it very much. I was also thanked afterward for representing the Pagan worldview, a thing the audience member in question said she hadn't seen much of. I guess either the popularity of Paganism at conventions is down or, more likely, the rise of the Religious Right and the "alt right" has made a lot of us back at least partway into the closet.

After that, I spent time painting and doing all the things that I go to cons for--chatting with people and filking and panels. One of the highlights was working on my painting of Cathy during her concert (and teaching some painting there, after all). During the filks, I sat with my sister. She painted, being of the firm opinion that a filk provides her with a good excuse to do art. I also painted during the filk, in between singing and playing songs myself and playing along with other people.

Here's a new detail from Cathy's painting. She suggested I add a sea horse, but when I saw a pic of an adult sea horse with a young one, I knew the painting needed more than one.



The con wasn't perfect, of course. I had to tell the Green Room staff how disappointing it was that they didn't keep the ingredients of the stuff in the room so I could tell if I could eat it or not (I've been eating in the green room with these food allergies at Capricon for years now, and in past years, they kept the ingredients panels from boxes in a spiral notebook). So I didn't eat much there. The ice cream in the con suite wasn't safe--but to my shock the hot dogs were (they still had the box!). Also, I brought some food. So I didn't starve, and more importantly, I didn't get sick, which I can't take for granted when I'm not cooking from scratch at home. So that has to count as a win.

And I sold a piece of art -- my Resist! black cat-eared hat. It didn't net me much income, but was a little more than the hanging fees, so overall, also a win. And to think I put the hat into the auction more as a political statement than expecting to sell it!

I guess I should go get some pink t-shirt material and make at least one more hat.
wyld_dandelyon: (Default)
After the dentist and dinner, I stayed up later than planned last night, finishing this. If no one buys it, I'm tempted to add a girl curled up, reading a book, in the biggest bubble, but I like the painting as-is, and besides, I can't paint up a decent person anywhere near as fast as I can do a flower or tree!

If you'll be there this evening stop by the Midwinter Faire and paint with me! Or maybe we can find time to get together in the Cafe and paint--there'll be musicians playing there on and off, if previous years are any indication.

And sketchfest is this weekend, so even if you're not there, we can, perhaps, do some art together virtually.

Here's the finished painting, with watermark. I think the photo is a little blurry--some of the details just aren't showing up. Oh, well. Maybe I can get a better photo (or at least some detail photos) at the con.

wyld_dandelyon: (Default)
So, we have this room off the TV room, either a very large closet or a very small room. The ancient carpet in it resisted being pulled when we moved in, so we left it there. We put the cat box in it, and plants, and some logs for the cats to climb on. Sadly, eventually an elderly feline started leaving messes there when the cat box wasn't as clean as he wanted. So the carpet had to go.

I've been working at cleaning the remaining carpet pad, which was glued (by intent or entropy) to the wood, up, a little every day. I got mad at something the current tweeter-in-chief did and overdid it a few days ago, and had several days where my wrist hurt. Last night, I got back to the painting, but not for long--after a while, even painting with my tiniest brush was more than I could do. But, I got her face and the imaginary friend roughed in.



Today, after getting the headlight fixed on the car (and it's 100,000 mile tuneup), I picked up some potting soil and seed starter (I have a lovely garden plot to plant in, after all), paid the bills (it hurt to write and type even more than it hurt to paint, over the last couple of days), and got back to painting.

The photos aren't great--I was holding the painting in one hand and the cell phone in the other--but at least you can see the progress I'm making.



So far, I have the goat and the necessary three of the other items for the challenge: the humanoid child, the imaginary friend, and the bubbles. I'm considering whether I should bother with the flag or the balance-scales. The humanoid kid does need a bubble-wand and jar of bubble-soap still, and work on the face. There will also certainly be more bubbles. I'm enjoying the bubbles.

And I'm really glad my wrist isn't hurting any more! It might even have healed faster if I wasn't too angry at watching Mitch McConnell officially silence Elizabeth Warren on the Senate floor for milder language than all the guys get away with using. That man needs his grandma to tell him she's ashamed of him. I sent a fax, but somehow I doubt it will have the same impact as a nice visit from Grandma Marley's ghost would. Or am I mashing up my stories too much? Still, it's not a bad daydream, and a better thought for bedtime than dwelling on the reality.

But regarding the painting, as always, comments and suggestions are welcome.
wyld_dandelyon: (Default)
So, I'm still working on the Capricon Challenge painting. I now have a goat and part of a child-satyr. She did have a face, but it was out of proportion with the body and not very good, so I've painted over her poor face.

She looks very awkward and sad this way, but the covering paint has to dry quite thoroughly before I try again or the background will blend into her skin tones, so she'll have to wait a bit for my new attempt.



The goat isn't too terrible, I guess.



I tried to find a spot where my shadow didn't fall on the goat; somehow that led to a much greener picture than we got for the kid, though I took the photos within a few feet of each other. The colored plastic shades on my lights must have more effect on the light than I realized!

I also dropped my brush and got paint on my skirt, a thing I normally manage to avoid. It (the skirt) is nothing special, so I didn't drop everything to go wash the paint out, but still, it's annoying. I'm used to painting in clothes I love without painting them--a much easier thing to do with real acrylics than with wall paint acrylics, I should note. That stuff is diluted for easy spreading and to still be spreadable if it's open to the air for hours and hours. So it's not really that impressive that I don't normally get painter's art acrylics on my clothes.

Tomorrow, hopefully, I can get the girl done, or at least more done, and start adding at least one imaginary (or not so imaginary) friend.
wyld_dandelyon: An exuberant dandelion I painted (dandelion art)
So, every year, Capricon has an artist's challenge, where artists have to include several things in a single work of art. Lately, I've been arriving at the con and painting one at the last minute--fun, but I know I could do better if I wasn't rushing that much. So this week, I looked up the particulars ahead of time.

This year the criteria are as follows: Artist’s Challenge Award: goes to special works which incorporate a goat (the convention’s mascot, so a goat is always one of the things that must be included) and three of the following: a humanoid child, blown soap bubbles, a flag, an imaginary friend, a set of (balance) scales.

I did a sketch background yesterday, and hoped to do a lot today, but work up feeling sick and unfocused. So not a lot--but a little, at least. Better than nothing.



For some reason, the first picture came out really green. Bad choice of lighting conditions, I guess, since mostly the cell phone gets really good color matching.

The plan is to include a kid (likely a child-satyr) swinging from the tree blowing bubbles with her imaginary friend. Her real companion, the goat, is in the tree and looking on or perhaps trying to bite the bubbles. I'm still pondering what sort of imaginary friend I should include.



As always, suggestions and comments are welcome.
wyld_dandelyon: (Default)
The convention was long, and lots of fun. I talked about writing a lot, both my personal writing and Torn World. Today I had a job interview, and watched Olympic skating.  I think the job interview went well, though the woman I interviewed with said she was sorry she had only one opening, because there were a number of very qualified applicants.

I don't feel nearly caught up with LJ, or with the Torn World forums, which were quite busy over the weekend.  And never mind Twitter or Facebook!

But I did share some feedback I got about the Torn World site with the canon board, and I believe soon the landing page (tornworld.net) will make it much easier for people to find the free stories and poetry, to get a sense of what Torn World is all about.

I have new stuff up at Torn World, including two poems that are locked for Patrons only. The first was written to enrich the Beads and Memories story, which mentions a poem but does not quote it. The second was written during the Torn World Muse Fusion, but not sponsored, and so was submitted to the site as a Patrons Only piece.

That poem was prompted by [livejournal.com profile] ysabetwordsmith , who told me she was glad to have inspired such a powerful piece of writing.  Which was very satisfying, being the most simple and positive comment she's made on my work so far.

Balancing that, I got a couple of rejections in my e-mail. 

You know, the expected and inevitable process of collecting rejections is easier to tolerate when it's not the only feedback you're getting!
wyld_dandelyon: (Default)
The convention was long, and lots of fun. I talked about writing a lot, both my personal writing and Torn World. Today I had a job interview, and watched Olympic skating.  I think the job interview went well, though the woman I interviewed with said she was sorry she had only one opening, because there were a number of very qualified applicants.

I don't feel nearly caught up with LJ, or with the Torn World forums, which were quite busy over the weekend.  And never mind Twitter or Facebook!

But I did share some feedback I got about the Torn World site with the canon board, and I believe soon the landing page (tornworld.net) will make it much easier for people to find the free stories and poetry, to get a sense of what Torn World is all about.

I have new stuff up at Torn World, including two poems that are locked for Patrons only. The first was written to enrich the Beads and Memories story, which mentions a poem but does not quote it. The second was written during the Torn World Muse Fusion, but not sponsored, and so was submitted to the site as a Patrons Only piece.

That poem was prompted by [livejournal.com profile] ysabetwordsmith , who told me she was glad to have inspired such a powerful piece of writing.  Which was very satisfying, being the most simple and positive comment she's made on my work so far.

Balancing that, I got a couple of rejections in my e-mail. 

You know, the expected and inevitable process of collecting rejections is easier to tolerate when it's not the only feedback you're getting!
wyld_dandelyon: (Default)
In Which the Dandelyon is Tired!

I woke up earlier than planned, because the covers had been pulled off half of me and my arm was Cold, and because my CPAP was out of water. Now, those two things were fixable, but I was also awakened from a dream where I'd been captured by this female serial killer-psychopath, and though I had plans to get away while I was in the dream, once I pulled the covers back over me, I started to slip back there, and realized that was NOT how I wanted to start my day. 

So I got up and made food, and made up a list of names that fit Torn World language rules.

Once Ellen opened the Muse Fusion, I started writing, interspersed with silly things like shoveling snow and mopping up cat puke. Oh, and calling a lady who sent me an e-mail about setting up a job interview. Naturally, all I got was her voice mail.

But back to Torn World.

Today I wrote the following:

An excerpt from a Southern book entitled Moon Myths of Assimilated Peoples of the Empire, which includes a children's song named Birash and Darash. I plan to post this as my freebie.  This was written from a prompt by [livejournal.com profile] valdary .

Building a Home, a short story set in the south, highlighting some of the conundrums posed by their licensing system (which is the way the state raises what we would call taxes, in addition to regulating behavior), from prompts by [livejournal.com profile] haunted_blood and [livejournal.com profile] allykat , and sponsored by [livejournal.com profile] allykat .  The characters in this story are Dini, Lalya, and Filor.  It is 1414 words long.

Alligator's First Midsummer Dance, from a prompt by [livejournal.com profile] kelkyag , and sponsored by Mikka.  This is another tale of the animals in the Riilass Swamps, where Skycat appears, but as a supporting (though not supportive) character.  It is 850 words long. 

An Afternoon Made of Stories, from prompts by [livejournal.com profile] tonithegreat , [livejournal.com profile] kelkyag , [livejournal.com profile] haunted_blood  and [livejournal.com profile] padparadscha .  In this story, we see Ivara as a young ranger, out riding with Dlameda, Marai, and Inama; we find out how Dlameda got that bearskin--and that's not even the exciting part. This one is available for sponsorship at $30, and is 1900 words long. 

Stillborn Dreams, from [livejournal.com profile] ysabetwordsmith 's prompt.  I like writing stories with happy endings, but this title just kept haunting me.  It's a 30-line poem, $9.

An Afternoon Made of Stories and Stillborn Dreams will be submitted as "subscriber only" material on the Torn World website if not sponsored here. 


There's still a bunch of really interesting prompts; I wouldn't be surprised if I wake up with another story in mind.  Though I have to get packed for Capricon.

Speaking of which -- is anyone looking for a couple of roommates at the con?
wyld_dandelyon: (Default)
In Which the Dandelyon is Tired!

I woke up earlier than planned, because the covers had been pulled off half of me and my arm was Cold, and because my CPAP was out of water. Now, those two things were fixable, but I was also awakened from a dream where I'd been captured by this female serial killer-psychopath, and though I had plans to get away while I was in the dream, once I pulled the covers back over me, I started to slip back there, and realized that was NOT how I wanted to start my day. 

So I got up and made food, and made up a list of names that fit Torn World language rules.

Once Ellen opened the Muse Fusion, I started writing, interspersed with silly things like shoveling snow and mopping up cat puke. Oh, and calling a lady who sent me an e-mail about setting up a job interview. Naturally, all I got was her voice mail.

But back to Torn World.

Today I wrote the following:

An excerpt from a Southern book entitled Moon Myths of Assimilated Peoples of the Empire, which includes a children's song named Birash and Darash. I plan to post this as my freebie.  This was written from a prompt by [livejournal.com profile] valdary .

Building a Home, a short story set in the south, highlighting some of the conundrums posed by their licensing system (which is the way the state raises what we would call taxes, in addition to regulating behavior), from prompts by [livejournal.com profile] haunted_blood and [livejournal.com profile] allykat , and sponsored by [livejournal.com profile] allykat .  The characters in this story are Dini, Lalya, and Filor.  It is 1414 words long.

Alligator's First Midsummer Dance, from a prompt by [livejournal.com profile] kelkyag , and sponsored by Mikka.  This is another tale of the animals in the Riilass Swamps, where Skycat appears, but as a supporting (though not supportive) character.  It is 850 words long. 

An Afternoon Made of Stories, from prompts by [livejournal.com profile] tonithegreat , [livejournal.com profile] kelkyag , [livejournal.com profile] haunted_blood  and [livejournal.com profile] padparadscha .  In this story, we see Ivara as a young ranger, out riding with Dlameda, Marai, and Inama; we find out how Dlameda got that bearskin--and that's not even the exciting part. This one is available for sponsorship at $30, and is 1900 words long. 

Stillborn Dreams, from [livejournal.com profile] ysabetwordsmith 's prompt.  I like writing stories with happy endings, but this title just kept haunting me.  It's a 30-line poem, $9.

An Afternoon Made of Stories and Stillborn Dreams will be submitted as "subscriber only" material on the Torn World website if not sponsored here. 


There's still a bunch of really interesting prompts; I wouldn't be surprised if I wake up with another story in mind.  Though I have to get packed for Capricon.

Speaking of which -- is anyone looking for a couple of roommates at the con?
wyld_dandelyon: (flying wizard by djinni)
And sadly, none of the people My Angel and I usually share rooms with will be there. My sister does live in Chicago, but not really nearby, and I do art and music and that means lugging around stuff, so I'm interested in exploring other options.
wyld_dandelyon: (flying wizard by djinni)
And sadly, none of the people My Angel and I usually share rooms with will be there. My sister does live in Chicago, but not really nearby, and I do art and music and that means lugging around stuff, so I'm interested in exploring other options.
wyld_dandelyon: (Default)
So I was up by 9 on Saturday too--got to be some sort of a record for me at a con, but I had a panel at 10, and I think much better with food, so up I got.  The panel was on LiveJournal/Blogging and Fandom, and ranged from the differences between Amateur Press Associations and blogging, to how to collect things like blogs from the viewpoint of a university curator, to image management using blogs and websites.  The anonymity of people online was discussed, both in positive aspects (having a place to vent and discuss problems in your industry without harming your or your employer's reputation, for instance) and negative (flame wars).  I particularly liked the idea of "disemvoweling" - instead of censoring words altogether, simply taking the vowels out of "flaming" posts.  People who have seen this done said it makes it easy to skim over the fighting while still following the more level-headed/polite parts of a thread.  And the importance of managing your image online was discussed too.  I think it was Lynne Thomas who said she is careful to represent herself online because no one else can do that "for" you. 

After this, I went to the drumming panel/workshop.  I knew Debbie was taking over for the originally scheduled presenter for this (who was detained at home by medical issues that turned out to be not serious, thank goodness), and figured she could use a friendly face, and maybe someone not completely ignorant of drumming and drum circles.  I enjoyed it very much; she moved from the very basics (there were some very beginning people there) and talked about vocabulary and etiquette, but moved fast enough that we got to learn two rhythms, divide the room and do them together, talk about other rhythms (including hemiola, which I love) and even do a short drum circle where people could do what they wanted at the end.  Not bad for less than an hour and a half.

Then off to the panel I'd been looking most forward to, the women in SF, my drum still over my shoulder (15 minutes is still not enough time to brave the elevators and be sure I can get to the next panel on time).  Along the way, I heard an off-hand and truly unnecessary comment from a certain person to his daughter about not growing up to be a drum majorette.  Sigh.  Though, in retrospect, that does kind of lead in to the next (and last) panel I was on, which was the changing roles of women in SF.  Then, I was just glad that the panel I was looking most forward to was about to begin, a good distration from someone saying stuff for no reason that I can discern besides trying to look clever while subtly (and inaccurately--there's nothing wrong with being a drum majorette and I've never been one besides) putting someone else down.  Again, sigh. 

The panel was very interesting, and well attended.  We started with panelists' backgrounds, which led into a lot of discussion of the changing roles of women in real life in our lifetimes, from time to time touching on SF, or mentinoning SF examples of things we were discussing.  Having been assigned as moderator, I spent a lot of time watching the audience's faces--they were both interested and involved, so I didn't worry that we were technically off-topic, though I did ask panelists and audience, in the last five minutes, for books they would recommend.  We have come a long way from the time when to be taken seriously, women writers of SF had to use ambiguous or male pen names (though many still do, especially if they write hard SF, so I guess that prejudice isn't completely gone).  One panelist got into trouble for reading "boys' books" in her childhood; she later got around the proscription by stating (truthfully, she notes, though she didn't say how interested they were in said books) that she was reading the "boys' books" to her younger brothers to get the librarians to allow her to take SF books home.  Les than a decade later, and in a much bigger city, I never had that problem, for which I am heartily thankful.

Being out of work, I spent very little time in the dealer's room.  Normally, just buying books would have earned me a power shopper patch, though shopping really isn't a significant focus in my life, which the patch might otherwise imply.  I did go through the art show, and then hurried off to the Where to Find (and sell) Short Fiction panel.  Those notes were primarily a list of online sites; maybe I'll do a post on those when I find time to look them up, since I do want to get organized to be submitting stories.

I grabbed food in the green room and went to the Wild Mercy concert, which was wonderful despite having put together a whole new set list on the fly and lacking Barry and Sally's talents due to the aforementioned medical issues.  The filk was much better attended, and I borrowed Art's tuner so our guitars, at least, were in tune with each other.  (I was tired enough that I did not want to retune the 36 strings of even one autoharp, when each was still in perfect tune with itself!)

Sunday was another get-up-too-early day, this time due to hotels wanting extra money for all late checkouts, so far as I can discern, in these poor-economy days.  Did some shopping - a friend called to say she'd lost her Goddess figurine, and would I find her a replacement; went to pick up art but their computer was down (they were glad I could hang around a while, so they could close out artists who had time schedules to meet first).  Signed up for a Renaissance Fan patch.  Did get some new-to-me books, as someone brought some to give away at Cafe Capricon; as I understand it, they'd been offered to gophers first, as a thank-you for volunteering, then to everyone else only late on Sunday.  And eventually got my art (sold two pieces, tho not expensive ones) and headed home, after checking one last time with ops and the hotel for the sweatshirt that had disappeared on Friday.

The postscript is that ops called after we got all the way to Milwaukee, they'd found my shirt.  I'd love to know where, and why it wasn't turned in to them until 5 pm on Sunday, and who to call to figure out if I can get it back before next year.  But at least I should get it back, one way or another.  Driving back to the hotel for it, when I was tired and there was snow to shovel, would have been a bad idea even if I still had a job.

Still, all in all, a good con.
wyld_dandelyon: (Default)
So I was up by 9 on Saturday too--got to be some sort of a record for me at a con, but I had a panel at 10, and I think much better with food, so up I got.  The panel was on LiveJournal/Blogging and Fandom, and ranged from the differences between Amateur Press Associations and blogging, to how to collect things like blogs from the viewpoint of a university curator, to image management using blogs and websites.  The anonymity of people online was discussed, both in positive aspects (having a place to vent and discuss problems in your industry without harming your or your employer's reputation, for instance) and negative (flame wars).  I particularly liked the idea of "disemvoweling" - instead of censoring words altogether, simply taking the vowels out of "flaming" posts.  People who have seen this done said it makes it easy to skim over the fighting while still following the more level-headed/polite parts of a thread.  And the importance of managing your image online was discussed too.  I think it was Lynne Thomas who said she is careful to represent herself online because no one else can do that "for" you. 

After this, I went to the drumming panel/workshop.  I knew Debbie was taking over for the originally scheduled presenter for this (who was detained at home by medical issues that turned out to be not serious, thank goodness), and figured she could use a friendly face, and maybe someone not completely ignorant of drumming and drum circles.  I enjoyed it very much; she moved from the very basics (there were some very beginning people there) and talked about vocabulary and etiquette, but moved fast enough that we got to learn two rhythms, divide the room and do them together, talk about other rhythms (including hemiola, which I love) and even do a short drum circle where people could do what they wanted at the end.  Not bad for less than an hour and a half.

Then off to the panel I'd been looking most forward to, the women in SF, my drum still over my shoulder (15 minutes is still not enough time to brave the elevators and be sure I can get to the next panel on time).  Along the way, I heard an off-hand and truly unnecessary comment from a certain person to his daughter about not growing up to be a drum majorette.  Sigh.  Though, in retrospect, that does kind of lead in to the next (and last) panel I was on, which was the changing roles of women in SF.  Then, I was just glad that the panel I was looking most forward to was about to begin, a good distration from someone saying stuff for no reason that I can discern besides trying to look clever while subtly (and inaccurately--there's nothing wrong with being a drum majorette and I've never been one besides) putting someone else down.  Again, sigh. 

The panel was very interesting, and well attended.  We started with panelists' backgrounds, which led into a lot of discussion of the changing roles of women in real life in our lifetimes, from time to time touching on SF, or mentinoning SF examples of things we were discussing.  Having been assigned as moderator, I spent a lot of time watching the audience's faces--they were both interested and involved, so I didn't worry that we were technically off-topic, though I did ask panelists and audience, in the last five minutes, for books they would recommend.  We have come a long way from the time when to be taken seriously, women writers of SF had to use ambiguous or male pen names (though many still do, especially if they write hard SF, so I guess that prejudice isn't completely gone).  One panelist got into trouble for reading "boys' books" in her childhood; she later got around the proscription by stating (truthfully, she notes, though she didn't say how interested they were in said books) that she was reading the "boys' books" to her younger brothers to get the librarians to allow her to take SF books home.  Les than a decade later, and in a much bigger city, I never had that problem, for which I am heartily thankful.

Being out of work, I spent very little time in the dealer's room.  Normally, just buying books would have earned me a power shopper patch, though shopping really isn't a significant focus in my life, which the patch might otherwise imply.  I did go through the art show, and then hurried off to the Where to Find (and sell) Short Fiction panel.  Those notes were primarily a list of online sites; maybe I'll do a post on those when I find time to look them up, since I do want to get organized to be submitting stories.

I grabbed food in the green room and went to the Wild Mercy concert, which was wonderful despite having put together a whole new set list on the fly and lacking Barry and Sally's talents due to the aforementioned medical issues.  The filk was much better attended, and I borrowed Art's tuner so our guitars, at least, were in tune with each other.  (I was tired enough that I did not want to retune the 36 strings of even one autoharp, when each was still in perfect tune with itself!)

Sunday was another get-up-too-early day, this time due to hotels wanting extra money for all late checkouts, so far as I can discern, in these poor-economy days.  Did some shopping - a friend called to say she'd lost her Goddess figurine, and would I find her a replacement; went to pick up art but their computer was down (they were glad I could hang around a while, so they could close out artists who had time schedules to meet first).  Signed up for a Renaissance Fan patch.  Did get some new-to-me books, as someone brought some to give away at Cafe Capricon; as I understand it, they'd been offered to gophers first, as a thank-you for volunteering, then to everyone else only late on Sunday.  And eventually got my art (sold two pieces, tho not expensive ones) and headed home, after checking one last time with ops and the hotel for the sweatshirt that had disappeared on Friday.

The postscript is that ops called after we got all the way to Milwaukee, they'd found my shirt.  I'd love to know where, and why it wasn't turned in to them until 5 pm on Sunday, and who to call to figure out if I can get it back before next year.  But at least I should get it back, one way or another.  Driving back to the hotel for it, when I was tired and there was snow to shovel, would have been a bad idea even if I still had a job.

Still, all in all, a good con.
wyld_dandelyon: (Default)

As you will remember, our intrepid fan is stuck without necessary equipment...

So, far too early, my cell phone starts singing to me, "Right Now...  (I'm not fond of many of the songs you don't have to pay for on this phone, but those words seem right for "wake up NOW".)  So I get up, hurry through a shower (with or without a tuner, I'll be onstage soon), and dash off to the con suite, where, happily, I find a bleary eyed musician with a wide-awake son, who is willing to lend me a tuner, "after I have some coffee".  So, we sit and talk, and I have some breakfast.  I am not exactly awake yet myself, when I go to get more milk, without looking I grab his cup, which clearly says "Starbucks Coffee" on it.  So, he loans me a tuner of a make I've never used before.  I assume there is a mysterious way to set it to something other than 440A, but don't need that function.  I head off to the Capricon Cafe room, where the concert will be, and set to tuning.  A friend is running the room, so I don't have to take the instruments to my panel--bonus.  And a kind-looking gentleman offered to read to me, from what turned out to be a sequel to Bronte's Egg.  Extra bonus.  A personal reading by Richard Chwedyk.  I enjoyed it a lot, and meant to introduce myself and find out when and where it would be published before rushing off, but it passed the time all too well and I suddenly realized I had two minutes to get to my first panel, at the other end of the hotel.  I hope he knows the hurried expression of appreciation I gave him while tucking the instruments behind the stage were heartfelt!

I figured I could find him later during the con, but my memory for faces is poor, and the whole time he was reading my eyes were fixed on tiny indicator lights.  The only time I saw him later, he had a whole circle of listeners, and I wasn't about to interrupt that!

My first panel was MCSI (Magical Crime Scene Investigation) where we talked a little about magic and a lot about real world issues that would relate to how the magic would (or wouldn't) work.  For instance, if a spell figures out (like a futuristic brain scan might be able to do) if someone is aware they are saying something made-up, it still won't tell you what they are making up, or how it relates to the investigation.  The difference between mistaken and lying.  "Pseudologia Fantastica" - the ability of some con men to enter so deeply into the con that they believe it while they are in it.  (Is this related to the ability of so many people to internalize the world and characters in their favorite TV shows or novels?)  The symbiotic relationship between language and one's perception of reality.

Then to the concert, where due to Capricon moving to a format of 75-minute panels in 90-minute time slots, I arrived a bit early.  Good thing--the borrowed tuner's 440A and [livejournal.com profile] filkart 's tuner's 440A did not match.  Everyone's brains croggled.  Retuning 42 strings (one autoharp and my guitar) would take pretty much the whole concert time; Art didn't want to do the concert without the autoharp, so we figured out that of the people present [livejournal.com profile] billroper could probably retune Art's 12-string fastest, so that's what happened.  Thanks Bill!  I still haven't figured out how the tuners weren't matched up, that's just so, so, wrong!  (I try to keep certain stronger words out of posts I don't friends-lock).  And I can't imagine that the question that goes with the answer regarding life, the universe, and everything, has to do with the number of strings I tuned...

I had just enough time to pack up the instruments and return them to my room, before heading toward my next panel, SF on TV.  In honor of The Twilight Zone, which hits its 50th anniversary in November, there was cake.  And I learned things, as I often do in panels--for instance, part of the reason the Firefly series failed is that Fox decided to air the episodes out of order.  I got to explain the term "story arc".

Then I was scheduled for Cap 101, where no neofen showed up at all, and Steven Silver spent a great deal of his time detailing the differences between the Chicago conventions, and the organizations that run them, and the fannish opportunities for socialization in between conventions in Chicago.  They weren't interested in filk, or happenings in Milwaukee, so I started writing down the bones of the short story that took shape in my head while I was chasing the elusive sleep the night before.  Longhand.  Ugh.  But the people were friendly, and I handed out the "merit badge" FIAWOL stickers.  (The earlier panels were Celluloid Devotee and hmm...I don't see a TV related sticker here.  Oh, well, if I find it later, I'll edit the post.)

After that, there was food and conversation and some filking, though no one stayed up very late, least of all me, since I had a panel sheduled for the next day at the un-ghodly hour of 10:00 a.m.  I even went in the Dealer's room, though I'm not much for window shopping, but it is a good place to run into people.

wyld_dandelyon: (Default)

As you will remember, our intrepid fan is stuck without necessary equipment...

So, far too early, my cell phone starts singing to me, "Right Now...  (I'm not fond of many of the songs you don't have to pay for on this phone, but those words seem right for "wake up NOW".)  So I get up, hurry through a shower (with or without a tuner, I'll be onstage soon), and dash off to the con suite, where, happily, I find a bleary eyed musician with a wide-awake son, who is willing to lend me a tuner, "after I have some coffee".  So, we sit and talk, and I have some breakfast.  I am not exactly awake yet myself, when I go to get more milk, without looking I grab his cup, which clearly says "Starbucks Coffee" on it.  So, he loans me a tuner of a make I've never used before.  I assume there is a mysterious way to set it to something other than 440A, but don't need that function.  I head off to the Capricon Cafe room, where the concert will be, and set to tuning.  A friend is running the room, so I don't have to take the instruments to my panel--bonus.  And a kind-looking gentleman offered to read to me, from what turned out to be a sequel to Bronte's Egg.  Extra bonus.  A personal reading by Richard Chwedyk.  I enjoyed it a lot, and meant to introduce myself and find out when and where it would be published before rushing off, but it passed the time all too well and I suddenly realized I had two minutes to get to my first panel, at the other end of the hotel.  I hope he knows the hurried expression of appreciation I gave him while tucking the instruments behind the stage were heartfelt!

I figured I could find him later during the con, but my memory for faces is poor, and the whole time he was reading my eyes were fixed on tiny indicator lights.  The only time I saw him later, he had a whole circle of listeners, and I wasn't about to interrupt that!

My first panel was MCSI (Magical Crime Scene Investigation) where we talked a little about magic and a lot about real world issues that would relate to how the magic would (or wouldn't) work.  For instance, if a spell figures out (like a futuristic brain scan might be able to do) if someone is aware they are saying something made-up, it still won't tell you what they are making up, or how it relates to the investigation.  The difference between mistaken and lying.  "Pseudologia Fantastica" - the ability of some con men to enter so deeply into the con that they believe it while they are in it.  (Is this related to the ability of so many people to internalize the world and characters in their favorite TV shows or novels?)  The symbiotic relationship between language and one's perception of reality.

Then to the concert, where due to Capricon moving to a format of 75-minute panels in 90-minute time slots, I arrived a bit early.  Good thing--the borrowed tuner's 440A and [livejournal.com profile] filkart 's tuner's 440A did not match.  Everyone's brains croggled.  Retuning 42 strings (one autoharp and my guitar) would take pretty much the whole concert time; Art didn't want to do the concert without the autoharp, so we figured out that of the people present [livejournal.com profile] billroper could probably retune Art's 12-string fastest, so that's what happened.  Thanks Bill!  I still haven't figured out how the tuners weren't matched up, that's just so, so, wrong!  (I try to keep certain stronger words out of posts I don't friends-lock).  And I can't imagine that the question that goes with the answer regarding life, the universe, and everything, has to do with the number of strings I tuned...

I had just enough time to pack up the instruments and return them to my room, before heading toward my next panel, SF on TV.  In honor of The Twilight Zone, which hits its 50th anniversary in November, there was cake.  And I learned things, as I often do in panels--for instance, part of the reason the Firefly series failed is that Fox decided to air the episodes out of order.  I got to explain the term "story arc".

Then I was scheduled for Cap 101, where no neofen showed up at all, and Steven Silver spent a great deal of his time detailing the differences between the Chicago conventions, and the organizations that run them, and the fannish opportunities for socialization in between conventions in Chicago.  They weren't interested in filk, or happenings in Milwaukee, so I started writing down the bones of the short story that took shape in my head while I was chasing the elusive sleep the night before.  Longhand.  Ugh.  But the people were friendly, and I handed out the "merit badge" FIAWOL stickers.  (The earlier panels were Celluloid Devotee and hmm...I don't see a TV related sticker here.  Oh, well, if I find it later, I'll edit the post.)

After that, there was food and conversation and some filking, though no one stayed up very late, least of all me, since I had a panel sheduled for the next day at the un-ghodly hour of 10:00 a.m.  I even went in the Dealer's room, though I'm not much for window shopping, but it is a good place to run into people.

wyld_dandelyon: (Default)
Prelude:  What a peaceful word for getting a call from an employment agency, setting up an interview for the next day, and then finding out that they want two IDs (to prove I'm a citizen), right now, for the first interview.  Well, I knew that would be needed to start a new job, but it was far from foremost in my mind lately.  And said papers weren't where I remembered leaving them.  Admittedly, between my last trip to Canada for FilkOntario and last week, I'd had radiators freeze with attendant chaos to the things in that general area, but still, I told myself, jobs are more important than cons, and I set to trying to find the necessary papers.  I found all sorts of cool things (photos of me at the Worldcon where I won ribbons for my Scraps (The Patchwork Girl of Oz) costume, for instance, but not them.  Finally, having stayed up way too late, I gave up and tried to get to sleep.  I did pretty well at the job interview, even OK at the typing test--I've been typing on an ergonomic keyboard for ten+ years, and they only had a standard one.  Then I got home, changed clothes, went online to get the bid sheets and control sheets to fill in, and started to gather things to put in the art show.  First the things that came back from Windycon (another, much shorter search, to find the Windycon receipt, since I was tired and wanted reminders of what I'd called things and how I'd priced them).  Then a few other things--oh, look, here are my birth certificate and SS card. 

Gee, if only I'd ignored duty and got art for the con packed first, I'd have had an earlier, more fun, and less frantic Tuesday night.  And better sleep.  And less chaos.  And I might even have finished the artist's challenge piece before the con!.  And been packing my music up earlier and in a better rested state, which later proved to be an important point.  Finally, I resigned myself to packing clothes the next morning, put my picks and such into the Martin gig bag, and headed for bed, only to oversleep the alarms.

So we did not get there as early on Thursday as I'd hoped (I wanted to get there by 2 or 3 and set up the art show items before setting up to paint at the Winterfaire, which was 5:30 to 7:30).  Instead we got there just before 5:30, I peeked in the green room to grab a soda (where I was told they didn't have stickers with our schedules to put on our badges yet), and then set up to paint.  I worked on The Dryad's Jewels, and a young lady sat down to paint with me (she got a sketchbook page).  It was fun, and since she said the dragon she painted was by far her best effort to date, I guess I did a good job with pointers and suggestions.  Oh, and I got my first real cloth "merit badge" of the con, for participating in special events.

In the meantime, my Angel parked the car, stopped by the Winterfaire for pizza and to pick up the stuff for the art show, headed there, unpacked (most of) the art, and started getting it set up.  The plan had been for her to stick the bid sheets on, but she had mislaid her reading glasses.  The process was also hindered by the fact that she hurried off before I could remind her that all the bid sheets were printed and in one of the bags, so she came to tell me she couldn't read the blank sheets to start filling them in for me without her glasses, but what she actually said was "everything is all hung up", so I went to see and approve of her mighty efforts, and make sure she'd taped the bid sheets to the right pieces of art, leaving the not-empty bags with my stuff in the Winterfaire.  Sigh.  I sent her back with bid sheets and the rest of the art, saying "do what you can", then finished Winterfaire before heading to the art show to finish setting things up.  Thank goodness I could do that Thursday, as I had three panels and a concert to do Friday!  I really didn't want to get up early Friday. 

Then I grabbed a sandwich in the green room, which tasted far more wonderful than cold cuts should, and consoled myself that arriving late to "Camp" Capricon at least didn't require me to set up a tent in the dark.

I wanted to tune the autoharps, cittern, and guitar, or at least the two that I needed for Friday's concert, but as soon as I'd finished eating, my body made it very clear to me that a nap was imperative, so I set up the facehugger and laid down to doze for a couple of hours.  Up again before midnight, I put an autoharp on the bed and dug in the gig bag for the Korg tuner.  Picks.  Extra picks.  Capos.  Another capo.  Pens.  Songs.  Kleenex.  But no tuner.  I searched all the instrument cases and the other bags related to filk, and then searched them again, spreading things all over our roommate's bed.  Nothing.  Well, lots of things, but no tuner.  With a panel and then a concert the next morning.  Aargh.  I could tune to myself of course, but that is a far cry from being sure that [livejournal.com profile] filkart  and I were both tuned to the proper 440A.  Ugh.  I rushed to clear off my stuff from the roommate's bed and then set off toward the filk room to borrow a tuner, praying that someone there would let me borrow one until the next morning, so I could touch up the tuning before the first panel.

And it was locked.  Empty.  Dark.  There were no filkers in sight.  Not in the lobby or the hallways or the consuite.  I checked Ops for completeness, they cheerfully told me that they didn't have a tuner (I knew that, with reasonable certainty, before I even poked my nose in there) and that they weren't filkers (once I'd set eyes on them I knew that for sure), but since they asked I figured I'd explain why I had poked my head in and stared at them.  Perhaps I should have said simply that they weren't the droids I was looking for.

Anyway, with no tuner in hand, and no idea how badly out of tune the autoharp I needed for just about all the songs Art had picked for his concert, now I needed to go back to sleep right away, so as to get up way, way too early in the hopes that some other, well-equipped filker might also be up early, or failing that, might there be a guitar store near the hotel?  And could I get there and back with time to tune (and without getting lost) before my first panel?  Having started the last two days short on sleep, and really needing a good night's sleep, naturally, it was a very long time before I caught any.


wyld_dandelyon: (Default)
Prelude:  What a peaceful word for getting a call from an employment agency, setting up an interview for the next day, and then finding out that they want two IDs (to prove I'm a citizen), right now, for the first interview.  Well, I knew that would be needed to start a new job, but it was far from foremost in my mind lately.  And said papers weren't where I remembered leaving them.  Admittedly, between my last trip to Canada for FilkOntario and last week, I'd had radiators freeze with attendant chaos to the things in that general area, but still, I told myself, jobs are more important than cons, and I set to trying to find the necessary papers.  I found all sorts of cool things (photos of me at the Worldcon where I won ribbons for my Scraps (The Patchwork Girl of Oz) costume, for instance, but not them.  Finally, having stayed up way too late, I gave up and tried to get to sleep.  I did pretty well at the job interview, even OK at the typing test--I've been typing on an ergonomic keyboard for ten+ years, and they only had a standard one.  Then I got home, changed clothes, went online to get the bid sheets and control sheets to fill in, and started to gather things to put in the art show.  First the things that came back from Windycon (another, much shorter search, to find the Windycon receipt, since I was tired and wanted reminders of what I'd called things and how I'd priced them).  Then a few other things--oh, look, here are my birth certificate and SS card. 

Gee, if only I'd ignored duty and got art for the con packed first, I'd have had an earlier, more fun, and less frantic Tuesday night.  And better sleep.  And less chaos.  And I might even have finished the artist's challenge piece before the con!.  And been packing my music up earlier and in a better rested state, which later proved to be an important point.  Finally, I resigned myself to packing clothes the next morning, put my picks and such into the Martin gig bag, and headed for bed, only to oversleep the alarms.

So we did not get there as early on Thursday as I'd hoped (I wanted to get there by 2 or 3 and set up the art show items before setting up to paint at the Winterfaire, which was 5:30 to 7:30).  Instead we got there just before 5:30, I peeked in the green room to grab a soda (where I was told they didn't have stickers with our schedules to put on our badges yet), and then set up to paint.  I worked on The Dryad's Jewels, and a young lady sat down to paint with me (she got a sketchbook page).  It was fun, and since she said the dragon she painted was by far her best effort to date, I guess I did a good job with pointers and suggestions.  Oh, and I got my first real cloth "merit badge" of the con, for participating in special events.

In the meantime, my Angel parked the car, stopped by the Winterfaire for pizza and to pick up the stuff for the art show, headed there, unpacked (most of) the art, and started getting it set up.  The plan had been for her to stick the bid sheets on, but she had mislaid her reading glasses.  The process was also hindered by the fact that she hurried off before I could remind her that all the bid sheets were printed and in one of the bags, so she came to tell me she couldn't read the blank sheets to start filling them in for me without her glasses, but what she actually said was "everything is all hung up", so I went to see and approve of her mighty efforts, and make sure she'd taped the bid sheets to the right pieces of art, leaving the not-empty bags with my stuff in the Winterfaire.  Sigh.  I sent her back with bid sheets and the rest of the art, saying "do what you can", then finished Winterfaire before heading to the art show to finish setting things up.  Thank goodness I could do that Thursday, as I had three panels and a concert to do Friday!  I really didn't want to get up early Friday. 

Then I grabbed a sandwich in the green room, which tasted far more wonderful than cold cuts should, and consoled myself that arriving late to "Camp" Capricon at least didn't require me to set up a tent in the dark.

I wanted to tune the autoharps, cittern, and guitar, or at least the two that I needed for Friday's concert, but as soon as I'd finished eating, my body made it very clear to me that a nap was imperative, so I set up the facehugger and laid down to doze for a couple of hours.  Up again before midnight, I put an autoharp on the bed and dug in the gig bag for the Korg tuner.  Picks.  Extra picks.  Capos.  Another capo.  Pens.  Songs.  Kleenex.  But no tuner.  I searched all the instrument cases and the other bags related to filk, and then searched them again, spreading things all over our roommate's bed.  Nothing.  Well, lots of things, but no tuner.  With a panel and then a concert the next morning.  Aargh.  I could tune to myself of course, but that is a far cry from being sure that [livejournal.com profile] filkart  and I were both tuned to the proper 440A.  Ugh.  I rushed to clear off my stuff from the roommate's bed and then set off toward the filk room to borrow a tuner, praying that someone there would let me borrow one until the next morning, so I could touch up the tuning before the first panel.

And it was locked.  Empty.  Dark.  There were no filkers in sight.  Not in the lobby or the hallways or the consuite.  I checked Ops for completeness, they cheerfully told me that they didn't have a tuner (I knew that, with reasonable certainty, before I even poked my nose in there) and that they weren't filkers (once I'd set eyes on them I knew that for sure), but since they asked I figured I'd explain why I had poked my head in and stared at them.  Perhaps I should have said simply that they weren't the droids I was looking for.

Anyway, with no tuner in hand, and no idea how badly out of tune the autoharp I needed for just about all the songs Art had picked for his concert, now I needed to go back to sleep right away, so as to get up way, way too early in the hopes that some other, well-equipped filker might also be up early, or failing that, might there be a guitar store near the hotel?  And could I get there and back with time to tune (and without getting lost) before my first panel?  Having started the last two days short on sleep, and really needing a good night's sleep, naturally, it was a very long time before I caught any.


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October 2017

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