wyld_dandelyon: (Default)
Yeah, the con report is a little late. Such is life.

I got to the hotel later than planned (the dentist trip the day before slowed me down), and piled the stuff I would need to teach people painting in the Midwinter Faire onto the little luggage cart I mostly use to take a few of my many instruments to filks, got to the usual area only to see no evidence of that event happening. Well, I thought, maybe they moved it. After a quick walk to programming ops, I found that they'd cancelled the event (too bad they didn't tell me, I would have brought less painting stuff). I also found that they were looking for people to add to several panels I was very interested in, one of which started immediately, so I took my paints and canvasses and spare paper and table cover and all to that room to talk about the allegation that there are only 7 stories (well, seven plot types, as it turned out). It was an interesting panel, and I did some sketching underneath my notes for the panel.



It turns out my in-panel doodles are much better when I expected to spend that time teaching art than they are when I am gearing up my thoughts to talking about writing, though I think I held my own on that front too.

Afterward, the art show found me space to hang some art (in addition to the Capricon Challenge piece) and I did that. This pic was taken before they printed the bid sheets.



The next morning, I got up very early (for me) to talk about Libraries in Space--or more specifically about what a library of a new colony on Mars would be like. That sounds like a planetary library to me, but that didn't make the topic any less interesting.

The final panel I was on was Theology in SF, which was fascinating. It was very different from the other excellent religion in SF panels I've been on at various cons in past years, which was due, partially, to the focus on deity rather than religion. I think it was also partially due to the fact that the panelists this time were primarily people fascinated by the study of religion, rather than primarily people who write science fiction--not that the two are in any way exclusive, because they're not, but the focus was more on views of God or Gods and how that affected various science fiction works, and less on how to make a fictional religion believable. I enjoyed it very much. I was also thanked afterward for representing the Pagan worldview, a thing the audience member in question said she hadn't seen much of. I guess either the popularity of Paganism at conventions is down or, more likely, the rise of the Religious Right and the "alt right" has made a lot of us back at least partway into the closet.

After that, I spent time painting and doing all the things that I go to cons for--chatting with people and filking and panels. One of the highlights was working on my painting of Cathy during her concert (and teaching some painting there, after all). During the filks, I sat with my sister. She painted, being of the firm opinion that a filk provides her with a good excuse to do art. I also painted during the filk, in between singing and playing songs myself and playing along with other people.

Here's a new detail from Cathy's painting. She suggested I add a sea horse, but when I saw a pic of an adult sea horse with a young one, I knew the painting needed more than one.



The con wasn't perfect, of course. I had to tell the Green Room staff how disappointing it was that they didn't keep the ingredients of the stuff in the room so I could tell if I could eat it or not (I've been eating in the green room with these food allergies at Capricon for years now, and in past years, they kept the ingredients panels from boxes in a spiral notebook). So I didn't eat much there. The ice cream in the con suite wasn't safe--but to my shock the hot dogs were (they still had the box!). Also, I brought some food. So I didn't starve, and more importantly, I didn't get sick, which I can't take for granted when I'm not cooking from scratch at home. So that has to count as a win.

And I sold a piece of art -- my Resist! black cat-eared hat. It didn't net me much income, but was a little more than the hanging fees, so overall, also a win. And to think I put the hat into the auction more as a political statement than expecting to sell it!

I guess I should go get some pink t-shirt material and make at least one more hat.
wyld_dandelyon: (guitar gloves)
I heard that MuseCon lost a couple of workshop leaders, and had some very last minute openings. "I don't do knitting or crochet, but I do applique and crazy quilt..."

We chatted a bit, and I slept on it.

Now I'm dreaming up steampunk crazy quilt stitches...

I hope some of you will be there!
wyld_dandelyon: (great wizard by djinni)
(or "when to expect my cell phone to be off this weekend")

I will be busy at Duckon. I hope to arrive on Friday before Nate Bucklin's guitar workshop at 8, but I must be there before 9, as that's my first panel:

Friday, June 17
9:00 P.M. Vampires: Hidden Desires Unleashed or Misdirected? (Mahogany Ballroom I)
Descript: Vampires in TV programs and movies are glamorous, desirable, and loveable. Ancient folklore and myth view them in not so admirable ways. How did we reach the point where everyone wants to have his or her own vampire girl/boy friend?

Saturday, June 18
3:00 P.M. Reality of Science Fiction/Fantasy Character Roles in True Life (Mahogany Ballroom I)
Descript: How many fictional roles appearing in books, magazines and movies are actually feasible in the real world? Could a Mulder exist and encounter aliens?
5:00 P.M. How Writers Motivate Themselves to Write (Mahogany Ballroom II)

Sunday, June 19
10:00 A.M. Writing in Someone Else's World (Mahogany Ballroom II)
11:00 A.M. Autographing (Room 1212) (You will share the room with Michael Williams and Shirley Damsgaard)
1:00 P.M. Balancing Historical Fact and Fiction (Mahogany Ballroom I)
Descript: How do you change the past but still make a believable story? What percentage of facts do you really twist without totally convoluting the reality of your alternate history? When does changing too many facts completely negate an understandable, possible future?
2:00 P.M. Reading (Room 1210) (You will be dividing your hour with Kathryn Sullivan.)

Four things in five hours on Sunday...I will have to eat a real meal on Saturday, sometime.  If someone wants to do lunch or dinner, l with a person who has to be not only gluten-free but also corn-free, especially if you have some idea where to find healthy food that meets those qualifications, please let me know!

If you'll be at the con, I'd love to see you at any of the panels.  If not (or even if you will be there), you're welcome to kibitz ahead of time on any of the above topics.  I have a nice, roomy comment thread available here, after all!

(In other news, here's the first rose in our garden this year; the picture was taken Friday.)
wyld_dandelyon: (great wizard by djinni)
(or "when to expect my cell phone to be off this weekend")

I will be busy at Duckon. I hope to arrive on Friday before Nate Bucklin's guitar workshop at 8, but I must be there before 9, as that's my first panel:

Friday, June 17
9:00 P.M. Vampires: Hidden Desires Unleashed or Misdirected? (Mahogany Ballroom I)
Descript: Vampires in TV programs and movies are glamorous, desirable, and loveable. Ancient folklore and myth view them in not so admirable ways. How did we reach the point where everyone wants to have his or her own vampire girl/boy friend?

Saturday, June 18
3:00 P.M. Reality of Science Fiction/Fantasy Character Roles in True Life (Mahogany Ballroom I)
Descript: How many fictional roles appearing in books, magazines and movies are actually feasible in the real world? Could a Mulder exist and encounter aliens?
5:00 P.M. How Writers Motivate Themselves to Write (Mahogany Ballroom II)

Sunday, June 19
10:00 A.M. Writing in Someone Else's World (Mahogany Ballroom II)
11:00 A.M. Autographing (Room 1212) (You will share the room with Michael Williams and Shirley Damsgaard)
1:00 P.M. Balancing Historical Fact and Fiction (Mahogany Ballroom I)
Descript: How do you change the past but still make a believable story? What percentage of facts do you really twist without totally convoluting the reality of your alternate history? When does changing too many facts completely negate an understandable, possible future?
2:00 P.M. Reading (Room 1210) (You will be dividing your hour with Kathryn Sullivan.)

Four things in five hours on Sunday...I will have to eat a real meal on Saturday, sometime.  If someone wants to do lunch or dinner, l with a person who has to be not only gluten-free but also corn-free, especially if you have some idea where to find healthy food that meets those qualifications, please let me know!

If you'll be at the con, I'd love to see you at any of the panels.  If not (or even if you will be there), you're welcome to kibitz ahead of time on any of the above topics.  I have a nice, roomy comment thread available here, after all!

(In other news, here's the first rose in our garden this year; the picture was taken Friday.)
wyld_dandelyon: (Default)
So I was up by 9 on Saturday too--got to be some sort of a record for me at a con, but I had a panel at 10, and I think much better with food, so up I got.  The panel was on LiveJournal/Blogging and Fandom, and ranged from the differences between Amateur Press Associations and blogging, to how to collect things like blogs from the viewpoint of a university curator, to image management using blogs and websites.  The anonymity of people online was discussed, both in positive aspects (having a place to vent and discuss problems in your industry without harming your or your employer's reputation, for instance) and negative (flame wars).  I particularly liked the idea of "disemvoweling" - instead of censoring words altogether, simply taking the vowels out of "flaming" posts.  People who have seen this done said it makes it easy to skim over the fighting while still following the more level-headed/polite parts of a thread.  And the importance of managing your image online was discussed too.  I think it was Lynne Thomas who said she is careful to represent herself online because no one else can do that "for" you. 

After this, I went to the drumming panel/workshop.  I knew Debbie was taking over for the originally scheduled presenter for this (who was detained at home by medical issues that turned out to be not serious, thank goodness), and figured she could use a friendly face, and maybe someone not completely ignorant of drumming and drum circles.  I enjoyed it very much; she moved from the very basics (there were some very beginning people there) and talked about vocabulary and etiquette, but moved fast enough that we got to learn two rhythms, divide the room and do them together, talk about other rhythms (including hemiola, which I love) and even do a short drum circle where people could do what they wanted at the end.  Not bad for less than an hour and a half.

Then off to the panel I'd been looking most forward to, the women in SF, my drum still over my shoulder (15 minutes is still not enough time to brave the elevators and be sure I can get to the next panel on time).  Along the way, I heard an off-hand and truly unnecessary comment from a certain person to his daughter about not growing up to be a drum majorette.  Sigh.  Though, in retrospect, that does kind of lead in to the next (and last) panel I was on, which was the changing roles of women in SF.  Then, I was just glad that the panel I was looking most forward to was about to begin, a good distration from someone saying stuff for no reason that I can discern besides trying to look clever while subtly (and inaccurately--there's nothing wrong with being a drum majorette and I've never been one besides) putting someone else down.  Again, sigh. 

The panel was very interesting, and well attended.  We started with panelists' backgrounds, which led into a lot of discussion of the changing roles of women in real life in our lifetimes, from time to time touching on SF, or mentinoning SF examples of things we were discussing.  Having been assigned as moderator, I spent a lot of time watching the audience's faces--they were both interested and involved, so I didn't worry that we were technically off-topic, though I did ask panelists and audience, in the last five minutes, for books they would recommend.  We have come a long way from the time when to be taken seriously, women writers of SF had to use ambiguous or male pen names (though many still do, especially if they write hard SF, so I guess that prejudice isn't completely gone).  One panelist got into trouble for reading "boys' books" in her childhood; she later got around the proscription by stating (truthfully, she notes, though she didn't say how interested they were in said books) that she was reading the "boys' books" to her younger brothers to get the librarians to allow her to take SF books home.  Les than a decade later, and in a much bigger city, I never had that problem, for which I am heartily thankful.

Being out of work, I spent very little time in the dealer's room.  Normally, just buying books would have earned me a power shopper patch, though shopping really isn't a significant focus in my life, which the patch might otherwise imply.  I did go through the art show, and then hurried off to the Where to Find (and sell) Short Fiction panel.  Those notes were primarily a list of online sites; maybe I'll do a post on those when I find time to look them up, since I do want to get organized to be submitting stories.

I grabbed food in the green room and went to the Wild Mercy concert, which was wonderful despite having put together a whole new set list on the fly and lacking Barry and Sally's talents due to the aforementioned medical issues.  The filk was much better attended, and I borrowed Art's tuner so our guitars, at least, were in tune with each other.  (I was tired enough that I did not want to retune the 36 strings of even one autoharp, when each was still in perfect tune with itself!)

Sunday was another get-up-too-early day, this time due to hotels wanting extra money for all late checkouts, so far as I can discern, in these poor-economy days.  Did some shopping - a friend called to say she'd lost her Goddess figurine, and would I find her a replacement; went to pick up art but their computer was down (they were glad I could hang around a while, so they could close out artists who had time schedules to meet first).  Signed up for a Renaissance Fan patch.  Did get some new-to-me books, as someone brought some to give away at Cafe Capricon; as I understand it, they'd been offered to gophers first, as a thank-you for volunteering, then to everyone else only late on Sunday.  And eventually got my art (sold two pieces, tho not expensive ones) and headed home, after checking one last time with ops and the hotel for the sweatshirt that had disappeared on Friday.

The postscript is that ops called after we got all the way to Milwaukee, they'd found my shirt.  I'd love to know where, and why it wasn't turned in to them until 5 pm on Sunday, and who to call to figure out if I can get it back before next year.  But at least I should get it back, one way or another.  Driving back to the hotel for it, when I was tired and there was snow to shovel, would have been a bad idea even if I still had a job.

Still, all in all, a good con.
wyld_dandelyon: (Default)
So I was up by 9 on Saturday too--got to be some sort of a record for me at a con, but I had a panel at 10, and I think much better with food, so up I got.  The panel was on LiveJournal/Blogging and Fandom, and ranged from the differences between Amateur Press Associations and blogging, to how to collect things like blogs from the viewpoint of a university curator, to image management using blogs and websites.  The anonymity of people online was discussed, both in positive aspects (having a place to vent and discuss problems in your industry without harming your or your employer's reputation, for instance) and negative (flame wars).  I particularly liked the idea of "disemvoweling" - instead of censoring words altogether, simply taking the vowels out of "flaming" posts.  People who have seen this done said it makes it easy to skim over the fighting while still following the more level-headed/polite parts of a thread.  And the importance of managing your image online was discussed too.  I think it was Lynne Thomas who said she is careful to represent herself online because no one else can do that "for" you. 

After this, I went to the drumming panel/workshop.  I knew Debbie was taking over for the originally scheduled presenter for this (who was detained at home by medical issues that turned out to be not serious, thank goodness), and figured she could use a friendly face, and maybe someone not completely ignorant of drumming and drum circles.  I enjoyed it very much; she moved from the very basics (there were some very beginning people there) and talked about vocabulary and etiquette, but moved fast enough that we got to learn two rhythms, divide the room and do them together, talk about other rhythms (including hemiola, which I love) and even do a short drum circle where people could do what they wanted at the end.  Not bad for less than an hour and a half.

Then off to the panel I'd been looking most forward to, the women in SF, my drum still over my shoulder (15 minutes is still not enough time to brave the elevators and be sure I can get to the next panel on time).  Along the way, I heard an off-hand and truly unnecessary comment from a certain person to his daughter about not growing up to be a drum majorette.  Sigh.  Though, in retrospect, that does kind of lead in to the next (and last) panel I was on, which was the changing roles of women in SF.  Then, I was just glad that the panel I was looking most forward to was about to begin, a good distration from someone saying stuff for no reason that I can discern besides trying to look clever while subtly (and inaccurately--there's nothing wrong with being a drum majorette and I've never been one besides) putting someone else down.  Again, sigh. 

The panel was very interesting, and well attended.  We started with panelists' backgrounds, which led into a lot of discussion of the changing roles of women in real life in our lifetimes, from time to time touching on SF, or mentinoning SF examples of things we were discussing.  Having been assigned as moderator, I spent a lot of time watching the audience's faces--they were both interested and involved, so I didn't worry that we were technically off-topic, though I did ask panelists and audience, in the last five minutes, for books they would recommend.  We have come a long way from the time when to be taken seriously, women writers of SF had to use ambiguous or male pen names (though many still do, especially if they write hard SF, so I guess that prejudice isn't completely gone).  One panelist got into trouble for reading "boys' books" in her childhood; she later got around the proscription by stating (truthfully, she notes, though she didn't say how interested they were in said books) that she was reading the "boys' books" to her younger brothers to get the librarians to allow her to take SF books home.  Les than a decade later, and in a much bigger city, I never had that problem, for which I am heartily thankful.

Being out of work, I spent very little time in the dealer's room.  Normally, just buying books would have earned me a power shopper patch, though shopping really isn't a significant focus in my life, which the patch might otherwise imply.  I did go through the art show, and then hurried off to the Where to Find (and sell) Short Fiction panel.  Those notes were primarily a list of online sites; maybe I'll do a post on those when I find time to look them up, since I do want to get organized to be submitting stories.

I grabbed food in the green room and went to the Wild Mercy concert, which was wonderful despite having put together a whole new set list on the fly and lacking Barry and Sally's talents due to the aforementioned medical issues.  The filk was much better attended, and I borrowed Art's tuner so our guitars, at least, were in tune with each other.  (I was tired enough that I did not want to retune the 36 strings of even one autoharp, when each was still in perfect tune with itself!)

Sunday was another get-up-too-early day, this time due to hotels wanting extra money for all late checkouts, so far as I can discern, in these poor-economy days.  Did some shopping - a friend called to say she'd lost her Goddess figurine, and would I find her a replacement; went to pick up art but their computer was down (they were glad I could hang around a while, so they could close out artists who had time schedules to meet first).  Signed up for a Renaissance Fan patch.  Did get some new-to-me books, as someone brought some to give away at Cafe Capricon; as I understand it, they'd been offered to gophers first, as a thank-you for volunteering, then to everyone else only late on Sunday.  And eventually got my art (sold two pieces, tho not expensive ones) and headed home, after checking one last time with ops and the hotel for the sweatshirt that had disappeared on Friday.

The postscript is that ops called after we got all the way to Milwaukee, they'd found my shirt.  I'd love to know where, and why it wasn't turned in to them until 5 pm on Sunday, and who to call to figure out if I can get it back before next year.  But at least I should get it back, one way or another.  Driving back to the hotel for it, when I was tired and there was snow to shovel, would have been a bad idea even if I still had a job.

Still, all in all, a good con.
wyld_dandelyon: (Default)

As you will remember, our intrepid fan is stuck without necessary equipment...

So, far too early, my cell phone starts singing to me, "Right Now...  (I'm not fond of many of the songs you don't have to pay for on this phone, but those words seem right for "wake up NOW".)  So I get up, hurry through a shower (with or without a tuner, I'll be onstage soon), and dash off to the con suite, where, happily, I find a bleary eyed musician with a wide-awake son, who is willing to lend me a tuner, "after I have some coffee".  So, we sit and talk, and I have some breakfast.  I am not exactly awake yet myself, when I go to get more milk, without looking I grab his cup, which clearly says "Starbucks Coffee" on it.  So, he loans me a tuner of a make I've never used before.  I assume there is a mysterious way to set it to something other than 440A, but don't need that function.  I head off to the Capricon Cafe room, where the concert will be, and set to tuning.  A friend is running the room, so I don't have to take the instruments to my panel--bonus.  And a kind-looking gentleman offered to read to me, from what turned out to be a sequel to Bronte's Egg.  Extra bonus.  A personal reading by Richard Chwedyk.  I enjoyed it a lot, and meant to introduce myself and find out when and where it would be published before rushing off, but it passed the time all too well and I suddenly realized I had two minutes to get to my first panel, at the other end of the hotel.  I hope he knows the hurried expression of appreciation I gave him while tucking the instruments behind the stage were heartfelt!

I figured I could find him later during the con, but my memory for faces is poor, and the whole time he was reading my eyes were fixed on tiny indicator lights.  The only time I saw him later, he had a whole circle of listeners, and I wasn't about to interrupt that!

My first panel was MCSI (Magical Crime Scene Investigation) where we talked a little about magic and a lot about real world issues that would relate to how the magic would (or wouldn't) work.  For instance, if a spell figures out (like a futuristic brain scan might be able to do) if someone is aware they are saying something made-up, it still won't tell you what they are making up, or how it relates to the investigation.  The difference between mistaken and lying.  "Pseudologia Fantastica" - the ability of some con men to enter so deeply into the con that they believe it while they are in it.  (Is this related to the ability of so many people to internalize the world and characters in their favorite TV shows or novels?)  The symbiotic relationship between language and one's perception of reality.

Then to the concert, where due to Capricon moving to a format of 75-minute panels in 90-minute time slots, I arrived a bit early.  Good thing--the borrowed tuner's 440A and [livejournal.com profile] filkart 's tuner's 440A did not match.  Everyone's brains croggled.  Retuning 42 strings (one autoharp and my guitar) would take pretty much the whole concert time; Art didn't want to do the concert without the autoharp, so we figured out that of the people present [livejournal.com profile] billroper could probably retune Art's 12-string fastest, so that's what happened.  Thanks Bill!  I still haven't figured out how the tuners weren't matched up, that's just so, so, wrong!  (I try to keep certain stronger words out of posts I don't friends-lock).  And I can't imagine that the question that goes with the answer regarding life, the universe, and everything, has to do with the number of strings I tuned...

I had just enough time to pack up the instruments and return them to my room, before heading toward my next panel, SF on TV.  In honor of The Twilight Zone, which hits its 50th anniversary in November, there was cake.  And I learned things, as I often do in panels--for instance, part of the reason the Firefly series failed is that Fox decided to air the episodes out of order.  I got to explain the term "story arc".

Then I was scheduled for Cap 101, where no neofen showed up at all, and Steven Silver spent a great deal of his time detailing the differences between the Chicago conventions, and the organizations that run them, and the fannish opportunities for socialization in between conventions in Chicago.  They weren't interested in filk, or happenings in Milwaukee, so I started writing down the bones of the short story that took shape in my head while I was chasing the elusive sleep the night before.  Longhand.  Ugh.  But the people were friendly, and I handed out the "merit badge" FIAWOL stickers.  (The earlier panels were Celluloid Devotee and hmm...I don't see a TV related sticker here.  Oh, well, if I find it later, I'll edit the post.)

After that, there was food and conversation and some filking, though no one stayed up very late, least of all me, since I had a panel sheduled for the next day at the un-ghodly hour of 10:00 a.m.  I even went in the Dealer's room, though I'm not much for window shopping, but it is a good place to run into people.

wyld_dandelyon: (Default)

As you will remember, our intrepid fan is stuck without necessary equipment...

So, far too early, my cell phone starts singing to me, "Right Now...  (I'm not fond of many of the songs you don't have to pay for on this phone, but those words seem right for "wake up NOW".)  So I get up, hurry through a shower (with or without a tuner, I'll be onstage soon), and dash off to the con suite, where, happily, I find a bleary eyed musician with a wide-awake son, who is willing to lend me a tuner, "after I have some coffee".  So, we sit and talk, and I have some breakfast.  I am not exactly awake yet myself, when I go to get more milk, without looking I grab his cup, which clearly says "Starbucks Coffee" on it.  So, he loans me a tuner of a make I've never used before.  I assume there is a mysterious way to set it to something other than 440A, but don't need that function.  I head off to the Capricon Cafe room, where the concert will be, and set to tuning.  A friend is running the room, so I don't have to take the instruments to my panel--bonus.  And a kind-looking gentleman offered to read to me, from what turned out to be a sequel to Bronte's Egg.  Extra bonus.  A personal reading by Richard Chwedyk.  I enjoyed it a lot, and meant to introduce myself and find out when and where it would be published before rushing off, but it passed the time all too well and I suddenly realized I had two minutes to get to my first panel, at the other end of the hotel.  I hope he knows the hurried expression of appreciation I gave him while tucking the instruments behind the stage were heartfelt!

I figured I could find him later during the con, but my memory for faces is poor, and the whole time he was reading my eyes were fixed on tiny indicator lights.  The only time I saw him later, he had a whole circle of listeners, and I wasn't about to interrupt that!

My first panel was MCSI (Magical Crime Scene Investigation) where we talked a little about magic and a lot about real world issues that would relate to how the magic would (or wouldn't) work.  For instance, if a spell figures out (like a futuristic brain scan might be able to do) if someone is aware they are saying something made-up, it still won't tell you what they are making up, or how it relates to the investigation.  The difference between mistaken and lying.  "Pseudologia Fantastica" - the ability of some con men to enter so deeply into the con that they believe it while they are in it.  (Is this related to the ability of so many people to internalize the world and characters in their favorite TV shows or novels?)  The symbiotic relationship between language and one's perception of reality.

Then to the concert, where due to Capricon moving to a format of 75-minute panels in 90-minute time slots, I arrived a bit early.  Good thing--the borrowed tuner's 440A and [livejournal.com profile] filkart 's tuner's 440A did not match.  Everyone's brains croggled.  Retuning 42 strings (one autoharp and my guitar) would take pretty much the whole concert time; Art didn't want to do the concert without the autoharp, so we figured out that of the people present [livejournal.com profile] billroper could probably retune Art's 12-string fastest, so that's what happened.  Thanks Bill!  I still haven't figured out how the tuners weren't matched up, that's just so, so, wrong!  (I try to keep certain stronger words out of posts I don't friends-lock).  And I can't imagine that the question that goes with the answer regarding life, the universe, and everything, has to do with the number of strings I tuned...

I had just enough time to pack up the instruments and return them to my room, before heading toward my next panel, SF on TV.  In honor of The Twilight Zone, which hits its 50th anniversary in November, there was cake.  And I learned things, as I often do in panels--for instance, part of the reason the Firefly series failed is that Fox decided to air the episodes out of order.  I got to explain the term "story arc".

Then I was scheduled for Cap 101, where no neofen showed up at all, and Steven Silver spent a great deal of his time detailing the differences between the Chicago conventions, and the organizations that run them, and the fannish opportunities for socialization in between conventions in Chicago.  They weren't interested in filk, or happenings in Milwaukee, so I started writing down the bones of the short story that took shape in my head while I was chasing the elusive sleep the night before.  Longhand.  Ugh.  But the people were friendly, and I handed out the "merit badge" FIAWOL stickers.  (The earlier panels were Celluloid Devotee and hmm...I don't see a TV related sticker here.  Oh, well, if I find it later, I'll edit the post.)

After that, there was food and conversation and some filking, though no one stayed up very late, least of all me, since I had a panel sheduled for the next day at the un-ghodly hour of 10:00 a.m.  I even went in the Dealer's room, though I'm not much for window shopping, but it is a good place to run into people.

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