wyld_dandelyon: (wigged Deirdre)
A long time ago, I was more active in the SCA than in fandom. No one hassles you about glasses in the SCA, but they're Not Period. So, when I got out my sketchbook (which I did a lot, since autoharps are also not period), I drew people without their glasses.

Through some strange mental alchemy, I stopped noticing people's glasses. It was as if they became invisible to me, unless something called attention to them. That persisted during the years when I rarely picked up a pencil to draw, and why not? It's the person that matters, not their clothes--or their glasses!

Then My Angel fell, nearly bleeding to death, and afterward joked to the nurses that her balance was better if she couldn't see. Sure enough, her eyes had, with age, degenerated to the point where she needed different prescriptions for each eye, and the lack of glasses was a bad idea. Suddenly I needed to retrain my brain to notice if she was wearing her glasses. Or at least try to. It's not as easy as you'd think to undo years of habit.

But I've made some progress.

At Worldcon, I joined my sister, Dragon, and her daughter at one of the Sketching From Life panels. At one point, while we were sketching, Dragon talked about the sketching she'd done while studying at the Art Institute of Chicago. She mentioned doing 30-second poses, and the teachers pressing them to draw at least something for each pose. In that zen-drawing state I was in, I responded that that sounded like fun. Several people nearby stared at me as if I was nuts, and Dragon answered, "What it is is really hard." "Well, yeah." I said. But hard doesn't mean not-fun. If you push enough past your limits and dive into the flow of the process, hard can be a great deal of fun.

Later, I went to the Hugo ceremonies, again with my sketchbook, and I thought, "Well, I said it would be fun, so why don't I just do it--sketch the people presenting and accepting Hugos. So I did--with varying levels of success, of course. Pushing your limits is always like that. And it was, indeed, fun.

I drew a lot of people--and I drew a LOT of glasses. The exercise made me very aware of an unsurprising fact. Most of my people, like me, wear glasses.
wyld_dandelyon: (wigged Deirdre)
So, I promised a post about stuff I got at the Civic Opera sale. I got some skirts, some purple pants with cool black and gold trim (the purple is nice and the trim is wonderful, but those will need to be taken apart and used for something else), a dress that has to be altered for My Angel or taken apart and used to make a dress for me (I'm still pondering what to do about that; I had hoped that there was enough seam allowance so I could let it out, but no such luck), and a lovely deep dark blue velvet medieval jacket that will, sooner or later, be modified into part of a wizard's robe, I'm thinking something glowy and steampunky.  I will post more about those when I actually do something with them.

But the two pieces I'm sharing today are a very nice cream/white skirt and a lovely robe made of brocades that was worn in the Gotterdamerung. The biggest problem was I needed a good shirt to go with them.

I have a gold brocade shirt, but the colors just weren't right.  I also have numerous purple shirts, but nothing in a suitable cut and material.

Then I came across some brocade scraps that I picked up off a freebie table at a con recently. The white in the brocade perfectly matched the skirt, and (despite being very PINK) looked good with the robe as well. The only problem was that the scraps were too small and odd-shaped to match up to any pattern. Happily, My Angel was willing to have me drape cloth over her and pin cloth together repeatedly.  i first prepped her by putting my bra over her shirt and padding it out (she's more slender than I am), and then we went back and forth from her to me until the material hung properly on both of us.  Then I got out the invisible nylon thread, which is a pain to work with, but which eliminated the need for carefully placed tiny stitches.  I stopped and went to bed as soon as the parts that show were done; I still need to finish off the hem at the waist, at least enough to prevent the material from fraying.

Now, I'd have been better off had I come up with this idea a week or two before Maneki Neko con, but sewing your costume the night before is something of a tradition.

I also took my pet arm dragon, though she matches the brocade well enough that people often missed her on my arm.

IMG_20140906_135131_721
awwwwwdwagon
manekimeclearer

Maneki Neko was a lovely small convention, very friendly and fun.  I may write more about it later.
wyld_dandelyon: (Rainbow Margay Mage)
I went to an excellent panel on anger in fiction at Loncon. They started with a quote from Abigail Nussbaum, who said there is an "increasing prevalence of vengeful victim characters, who are condemned not for the choices they make in pursuit of revenge, but simply for feeling anger..." (emphasis added)

My first reaction on reading that quote was, Wait--that's not fair! Anger is an emotion. Sure, it's a powerful one. It's a reaction to bad things happening, but the emotion itself isn't bad, and feeling it doesn't make you a bad person. Sure, anger can inspire you to do bad things, but so can any emotion, including "good" emotions like love. And it's just not right to punish people for their feelings.

I have long maintained that anger is a powerful emotion, and potentially a strong force for good. Anger is the energy that says "this is wrong and has to change". Sometimes you need to move past anger without making a change--for example, if you are dying, no change is possible, and you have to move on in the grief cycle.

But other times change is both possible and desirable; the challenge then isn't to eliminate the anger, but to find ways to channel that energy constructively rather than destructively.

The panel itself was interesting; people said you need to separate the emotion from the consequences; it was clear that they were recognizing that when you feel anger, or another emotion, you have choices to make not only about whether to express it but how to express it. I would have said you need to separate the emotion from the action, and also the emotion and action from the consequences. That might seem nit-picky, but I have run into problems in the past where one person assumed that the only possible reason for an action was his reason for that action, and he condemned someone else not for the action, but for what he thought was the motive for the action.

Another thing that was discussed by panelists is something I could rephrase into the old cliche, "the squeaky wheel gets the grease." You have to speak up to initiate a change, but sometimes merely speaking up isn't enough. Sometimes you have to be loud and persistent to be noticed. (Of course, sometimes being loud just gets the people you need to listen to shy away in fear or distaste. Other times, it locks your desired audience into a closed defensive mind-set where they are too busy defending against a perceived or real attack to really hear your words.) But that doesn't change the fact that sometimes yelling is needed to convince someone to listen.

Panelists also mentioned things I hadn't realized, for instance the fact that if a minority expresses dissatisfaction with the status quo, no matter how politely or calmly they speak, they are perceived to be angry. This was a big "aha" moment for me, since I've been bewildered at the reactions I've gotten from white men at times--them believing I was making an angry attack would explain things nicely.

This also (in my mind, anyway, though I don't remember any one panelist stating this conclusion) may explain why we are taught that anger is a negative and harmful emotion--it's a force of change, and the people in charge want to stay in charge. Anger is dangerous to them not only when it is expressed destructively, but even and perhaps especially when it is expressed constructively.

Anger might lead to real change, after all.

And there's certainly things that need changing all around us.

So, if you're angry (and I hope you are, at least some of the time), be careful. How you express your anger matters. If you're not careful, you could destroy things you value, hurt your friends and alienate your allies. You could make the needed changes harder.

You've got to remember that the goal isn't merely expressing your feelings. That's important, but it isn't nearly enough.

So if you're angry, consider what your bigger goal is, consider your audience, and act carefully. Good luck making the changes you need manifest in your life!


And now I'm off to consult with certain of my characters, because I suspect some of the stuck-bits in my stories have to do with not identifying or clearly showing their anger. I wonder how many of them will heed my advice? Will they make changes or dig themselves in deeper? You know, from a writing perspective, this is exciting stuff!
wyld_dandelyon: (Rainbow Margay Mage)
Loncon gathered a symphony orchestra and arranged a science-fiction and fantasy-themed concert, and it was

AMAZING

The musicians were wonderul, and the music well-chosen. I'd never really thought of Worldcon as a cultural spectacle before, but this made me realize that just like the Olympics is a celebration of one aspect of humanity at its best, Worldcon is a celebration of a different aspect of humanity at its best.

I'm sorry you couldn't all be there with me. I was surprisingly touched to hear a live symphony performance of Star Trek themes. For all the flaws in the TV shows and movies, they have adhered to the shows original vision, that not only will we survive, but we can overcome our violent past and have not only _a_ future, but a better future. It brought tears to my eyes to hear world-class musicians honoring my people, honoring speculative fiction, and especially honoring that particular vision and hope for the future.

In the light of the terrible things in the news this week, that's a reminder that I sorely needed.

I wish you all could have been with me.

If hope they made and will be selling a recording.
wyld_dandelyon: (Guitar Angel)
for a whole weekend. I went to Windycon, totally ignored the panels, and spent the whole weekend doing music and applique. Well, I did wander through the dealer's room and the art show, and tried to sleep (the bed hated me), and I went swimming briefly too. But it was a break from my usual routine, and I'm sure it would have been very restful if the hotel bed had been friendly.

And I didn't write a word--unless you count tweaking Green Eyed Friend after a tune came to me late Friday night (or early Saturday morning, depending on how you count such things).

I also spent some very pleasant time with my sister, Dragon, who spent some time drawing me, thus the new icon.

I suppose now it's time to get back into the swing of things, writing-wise, seeing as how I've been back to work for two days already.
wyld_dandelyon: (Scientist Geek Magician)
I'm home, I went back to work (to a mountain of mail, e-mail, and messages), yet Worldcon is still filling my thoughts.

Once Worldcon really started, I didn't get my computer open much, except for taking notes during the lyric writing workshop, and now I have bills to pay, errands to run, spam comments in my LJ to delete, and stories to finish, so if I missed something important on LJ in the last week, you're welcome to call my attention to it here.

It's way too long since I was at a Worldcon. As much as I love being in filk song circles, I kept finding myself talking to people in the corridors instead of going in and singing. Gail Bailey gave me a beautiful length of lavender tatting, too short for much besides a bookmark, though I'd rather attach it to a garment and show it off than bury it in a book.

I met people who only know me as Wyld_Dandelyon, people who had heard my voice for years on filk tapes but didn't know what I look like, and people I haven't seen in way too long. I met Stina Leicht, who was autographing next to me, watched the Hugos (and even committed haiku there). The Hugo base design this year is STUNNING--you can see it here: http://litstack.com/?tag=hugo-award, but in person the glass has a steely blue tone and simply gleams, even in the predictably boring light of a basement convention hall.  Deb Kosiba, the artist, outdid herself.

I was on some fantastic panels, especially the Broad Universe Rapid Fire Reading (17 authors read from their work in ng an hour and a half) and Storytelling the Old Fashioned Way, featuring four writers who also have performed live in various venues.  There were dozens of panels I wanted to see, too many of which conflicted with things I was on.  (I actually drew lines through entire time slots because each slot took up more than two pages there were so many different programming items at the same time, and I didn't want to miss my own programming items). 

I also participated in a fishbowl event, where various writers sat in the fan lounge writing.  The signed original text was auctioned during the Art Auction with the proceeds going to charity.  I don't know how much it went for--I was napping at the time, after the unexpected cardio-hour on two hours of sleep wherein I rushed back and forth trying to find the person running the fishbowl event, so I could sign the printout, learned about and found a lost phone, found a stranger working the art show who had another stranger's badge, and quite thoroughly used up all the energy I'd gotten from my morning's nap.

I listened to some great live music, sat in some standing-room-only panels, read some of my work aloud, sang some songs (mine and other people's), smiled at fannish babies, handed out dozens of Torn World ribbons and postcard/flyers, sold a very few books (Subversion was popular at this event), bought a few books and CDs, got a new patch for my gig bag, resisted gorgeous jewelry of all designs (including stunning jeweled space ships) and chatted with friends new and old.  It was a good con, even if it would have been better with a time-travel device to let me do more things and get more sleep. 

If I have enough money and time off from work, in two years, I could go to Worldcon in London and then, a week later, to Eurocon in Ireland.  That would be a cool trip!  Now if I could just avoid the need to pay for stuff like car repairs and root canals...
wyld_dandelyon: (sleeping dragon by Djinni)
I was much younger when I did two cons two weekends in a row. Wiscon was great, all intellectual and thought provoking and when it wasn't, I tried writing in the Google doc where I'm collaborating on a story (that worked pretty well, actually). Duckon was appropriately nicknamed "cardio-con" and there were people I wanted to see that I heard were there, somewhere.

This last weekend I finally got to the Bead and Button show. I'm not sure if I got the right beads to make a couple of necklaces I've been working on work right yet, however, I did get some cool things and I now just need a quick trip to Planet Bead for cord and either red or gold seed beads to have one that I hadn't planned, but will be Really Cool, I think, when it's done. Here's the beads - the little ones are butterflies, not sure if that will be clear in the picture:

new beads
wyld_dandelyon: (outpost picnic)
So, the fan GOH at Windycon decided to bring a guest, a harpist who had never been to a filk.

Such things happen, you say, and of course that's true.

But go thou and look at her Kickstarter campaign video--she made this and started raising money to make cool filk videos before ever going to a science fiction convention: http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/1242097495/erin-hill-the-sci-fi-harp-girl-makes-a-music-video

I got to be part of her first filk ever!  Thanks, Hugh!

Go, check her out, regardless of whether you have money to support her efforts. 
wyld_dandelyon: (outpost picnic)
So, the fan GOH at Windycon decided to bring a guest, a harpist who had never been to a filk.

Such things happen, you say, and of course that's true.

But go thou and look at her Kickstarter campaign video--she made this and started raising money to make cool filk videos before ever going to a science fiction convention: http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/1242097495/erin-hill-the-sci-fi-harp-girl-makes-a-music-video

I got to be part of her first filk ever!  Thanks, Hugh!

Go, check her out, regardless of whether you have money to support her efforts. 
wyld_dandelyon: (Default)
I was SO tired Friday it wasn't funny. We got to the con way late, probably as a result of me just being too tired to move fast once work let out. So I was good Friday night, and went to bed early (well, early for me at a con) intending to be well-rested for Saturday.

I woke up way too early with a terrible headache after dreaming that I was in a deep dark lake full of algae (and had been there for far too long) and I had to keep trying to swim up to the surface to breathe. I took my asthma medicine, ate some cheese for the protein, looked futilely for Tylenol, and sat up reading for a bit without ever really getting wide awake or into a state where I felt I could sleep again. Watched an Indian wedding procession under my window, sad that I was too far up to see details of the saris, the white horse, the decorated red umbrella, and all the mens' clothing too. But still, that was cool. Finally, I went swimming, which relaxed my back and neck, woke my appetite, and left the headache still pounding.

Happily, Ops had Tylenol after that, and I took allergy meds for good measure, and slowly the headache started to resolve. I avoided the music workshops, figuring they wouldn't help the headache any, and went to the jewelry-making workshop (where I gathered mostly leaf-, moon-, and heart-shaped beads and added them to some I'd brought with me to make a necklace) and then the sketching workshop. Did a pretty good demented happy cat there, though too small to really do anything with it. Then I went to the poi-spinning workshop. That was fun and left my shoulders feeling remarkably good. Then, of course, [livejournal.com profile] ericcoleman 's wedding.  (Does his beautiful wife have a LJ?  I can't remember.)

I looked at the food available in the room and decided I needed meat, so I went to one of the hotel restaurants. Didn't find anyone along the way, so I was again reading, but it was pleasant. A bunch of people from the Indian wedding came in while I was eating, keeping the staff very busy indeed. I guessed at tax, added a generous tip to be sure, and gave the nice man behind the bar cash before running to catch the [livejournal.com profile] s00j  concert, where I proceeded to spin poi some more and do veil dancing with two other women.  And the Alligator conga dance, of course. 

After the concert, I drifted slowly, fighting exhaustion, toward the room intending to take my asthma meds and head back down with instruments for the filk.  I was almost finished with my book--less than a page once I'd done both inhalers with pauses in between so each dose would have time to take effect before the next one, which is always helpful for singing.  I couldn't keep my eyes open long enough to finish the last few paragraphs of the book.  I fell into bed, figuring that was a better choice than snoring over the live music.

The next morning, I went swimming briefly again, just enough to stretch out my now stiff-and-sore back and shoulders.  There was a music and energy workshop by [livejournal.com profile] s00j  and then a laid back folk jam where I finally got the guitar out for a while.  After that there were closing ceremonies, and I was still tired.  Next year, I think I'll take an air mattress.

I had planned to set up to paint like I did last year; that didn't happen.  Neither did making an alligator-blinkie (the first blinkie style that has tempted me to spend part of a convention soldering).  Nor did I work on the sewing I'd brought.  But I did manage to share a bit about Torn World despite this convention being so different from a standard SF con, and some of the Torn World postcards I had made were taken away from my hand and others from the freebie table.  Several Ellen Million Graphics cards left the freebie table too.

And despite being in a tired-fog all weekend, and having a headache that lasted most of Saturday, I had fun. 
wyld_dandelyon: (Default)
I was SO tired Friday it wasn't funny. We got to the con way late, probably as a result of me just being too tired to move fast once work let out. So I was good Friday night, and went to bed early (well, early for me at a con) intending to be well-rested for Saturday.

I woke up way too early with a terrible headache after dreaming that I was in a deep dark lake full of algae (and had been there for far too long) and I had to keep trying to swim up to the surface to breathe. I took my asthma medicine, ate some cheese for the protein, looked futilely for Tylenol, and sat up reading for a bit without ever really getting wide awake or into a state where I felt I could sleep again. Watched an Indian wedding procession under my window, sad that I was too far up to see details of the saris, the white horse, the decorated red umbrella, and all the mens' clothing too. But still, that was cool. Finally, I went swimming, which relaxed my back and neck, woke my appetite, and left the headache still pounding.

Happily, Ops had Tylenol after that, and I took allergy meds for good measure, and slowly the headache started to resolve. I avoided the music workshops, figuring they wouldn't help the headache any, and went to the jewelry-making workshop (where I gathered mostly leaf-, moon-, and heart-shaped beads and added them to some I'd brought with me to make a necklace) and then the sketching workshop. Did a pretty good demented happy cat there, though too small to really do anything with it. Then I went to the poi-spinning workshop. That was fun and left my shoulders feeling remarkably good. Then, of course, [livejournal.com profile] ericcoleman 's wedding.  (Does his beautiful wife have a LJ?  I can't remember.)

I looked at the food available in the room and decided I needed meat, so I went to one of the hotel restaurants. Didn't find anyone along the way, so I was again reading, but it was pleasant. A bunch of people from the Indian wedding came in while I was eating, keeping the staff very busy indeed. I guessed at tax, added a generous tip to be sure, and gave the nice man behind the bar cash before running to catch the [livejournal.com profile] s00j  concert, where I proceeded to spin poi some more and do veil dancing with two other women.  And the Alligator conga dance, of course. 

After the concert, I drifted slowly, fighting exhaustion, toward the room intending to take my asthma meds and head back down with instruments for the filk.  I was almost finished with my book--less than a page once I'd done both inhalers with pauses in between so each dose would have time to take effect before the next one, which is always helpful for singing.  I couldn't keep my eyes open long enough to finish the last few paragraphs of the book.  I fell into bed, figuring that was a better choice than snoring over the live music.

The next morning, I went swimming briefly again, just enough to stretch out my now stiff-and-sore back and shoulders.  There was a music and energy workshop by [livejournal.com profile] s00j  and then a laid back folk jam where I finally got the guitar out for a while.  After that there were closing ceremonies, and I was still tired.  Next year, I think I'll take an air mattress.

I had planned to set up to paint like I did last year; that didn't happen.  Neither did making an alligator-blinkie (the first blinkie style that has tempted me to spend part of a convention soldering).  Nor did I work on the sewing I'd brought.  But I did manage to share a bit about Torn World despite this convention being so different from a standard SF con, and some of the Torn World postcards I had made were taken away from my hand and others from the freebie table.  Several Ellen Million Graphics cards left the freebie table too.

And despite being in a tired-fog all weekend, and having a headache that lasted most of Saturday, I had fun. 
wyld_dandelyon: (Allegedly Sleepy)
I'm tired, so I'll just share a brief memory:

So, there I was, at Duckon, with the new Torn World book in hand.  Yeah, the one with the beautiful, huge white unicorn on the cover.  And I head off to my first panel, about the appeal of vampires!  I had to laugh--there's few panels where a beautiful unicorn would look more out of place.

After the vampire panel, I sold a copy of the book to someone in the audience.

Sometimes life is strange and wonderful.


Since there's space here next to the photo, and the typesetter in me hates excessive amounts of white space, here's a (redundant) link to the order page for Family Ties & Torn Skies:  Buy Our Book!    If you're a Torn World subscriber, be sure you are logged in before buying--supporters get a discount!


Good night, everyone!
wyld_dandelyon: (Allegedly Sleepy)
I'm tired, so I'll just share a brief memory:

So, there I was, at Duckon, with the new Torn World book in hand.  Yeah, the one with the beautiful, huge white unicorn on the cover.  And I head off to my first panel, about the appeal of vampires!  I had to laugh--there's few panels where a beautiful unicorn would look more out of place.

After the vampire panel, I sold a copy of the book to someone in the audience.

Sometimes life is strange and wonderful.


Since there's space here next to the photo, and the typesetter in me hates excessive amounts of white space, here's a (redundant) link to the order page for Family Ties & Torn Skies:  Buy Our Book!    If you're a Torn World subscriber, be sure you are logged in before buying--supporters get a discount!


Good night, everyone!
wyld_dandelyon: (a wizard writing)
I meant to post about green rooms at cons, but I haven't gotten to it (yet). Perhaps next week.

I also want to do my very belated con report of MuseCon 0, so it will appear in print before MuseCon 1 happens. Again, maybe next week.

In the meantime, it's late, I have work in the morning, and even better, the Torn World Muse Fusion starts tomorrow!

I hope you'll stop by with a few prompts--maybe even a crisis or two to weave into a story.
wyld_dandelyon: (a wizard writing)
I meant to post about green rooms at cons, but I haven't gotten to it (yet). Perhaps next week.

I also want to do my very belated con report of MuseCon 0, so it will appear in print before MuseCon 1 happens. Again, maybe next week.

In the meantime, it's late, I have work in the morning, and even better, the Torn World Muse Fusion starts tomorrow!

I hope you'll stop by with a few prompts--maybe even a crisis or two to weave into a story.
wyld_dandelyon: (Polychrome Wizard)
It was great to finally show people the first Torn World anthology (even if having the first panel where I showed off the beautiful book with the beautiful, big white unicorn on the cover was a vampire panel). I had fun despite all the new carpets outgassing and killing my singing voice, and the other less than optimal conditions beyond my control.

Now I'm home, and have to go to work in the morning, so I'll leave more details for later.

Thank you to everyone who bought the book at the con!

Good night, everyone! Sweet dreams.
wyld_dandelyon: (Polychrome Wizard)
It was great to finally show people the first Torn World anthology (even if having the first panel where I showed off the beautiful book with the beautiful, big white unicorn on the cover was a vampire panel). I had fun despite all the new carpets outgassing and killing my singing voice, and the other less than optimal conditions beyond my control.

Now I'm home, and have to go to work in the morning, so I'll leave more details for later.

Thank you to everyone who bought the book at the con!

Good night, everyone! Sweet dreams.
wyld_dandelyon: (Polychrome Wizard)
The photos here, as my friends here requested, are from my Dance of Leaves dress, which I was working on during the Tricky Pixie concert, which as I remember is where I left off in the story last night.

Eventually, as must always happen, the music ended and the lights brightened again. I had brought some of my own fairy gold (the chocolate sort), and gifted the performers after the Tricky Pixie concert. Dragon shared her artwork, and promised to send the original if we can get an address.

And then we headed off to feast our eyes on visual arts, our heads full of music.

Sadly, in the art show, I realized I had only one of the beautiful amethyst and quartz earrings I’d made still dangling from an ear. The other ear was sad and naked. We checked all the likely spots, in the process picking up a bit of cloth that had fallen from my appliqué project during the concert, and which must have been hidden under a chair before the denizens of that place rearranged the chairs—the concerts used a wall as backdrop, but the masquerade was to use the glass windows and doors on the side of the room instead, so when we returned to the same place a few minutes later, all the chairs had been magically moved.

Then My Angel fled to take a nap, as if a field of poppies had stolen all her energy. Dragon invited me to dinner, and we discovered that all the tables in the restaurant had been reserved. We were invited to wait in the bar for an hour. Dragon used words of power, and they admitted that yes, indeed, they could serve dinner in the bar as well. I challenged the restaurant to feed me safely, and they succeeded most elegantly, and the food (stuffed flounder for me and seafood risotto for Dragon) was delightful. So, reportedly, was the lobster ravioli we took back to My Angel. And I heard the dealers’ lament that during the Tricky Pixie concert no one was there to buy things but the other dealers. As Dragon said, everyone who was anyone was at the concert.

And then there was more music. I didn’t quite make it to the Ninjas’ concert, though I played music with them both the night before and the night after.

It may have been a fae blessing, or perhaps the simple mundane blessing of a government that banned cigarette smoking in hotels, but my voice got stronger all weekend, if you discount a few wobbles after 3 am. One of the handles to the bag holding my laptop came apart—but as I was bending to pick it up, so the laptop wasn’t jostled. I was able to tune the autoharp to itself by ear so I could do a request without spending a half hour on retuning every string.

After a modicum of sleep, while packing up to get out of the hotel, I found the missing earring, which had fallen into my sewing rather than wandering off to serve as an accidental toll for my passage.

Then, there was more music! I think the dead dog filk was possibly the best open filk this weekend, perhaps because everyone was relaxed, and no one had to worry about preparing for a concert or running off to a panel or event. Filkart ended up on the other side of the room, which was fine for the songs we do together that I have memorized. When he did a song where I needed to see the words, I borrowed the seat next to him, but soon stood up, since the fey magic, though strong, didn’t extend far enough to let me see through his guitar neck. And I even ended up playing guitar standing for two songs—something I haven’t done in ages. I was having so much fun, and despite mundane standards suggesting I’d had less sleep and should therefore be tireder than when I arrived, I felt energized.

Of course, finally, we had to head home. We set out to reverse the path we’d trod (well, driven). But Faerie didn’t want to let us go, and I finally had to resort to Modern Technology to start to banish the hold on our travels and let us return to paths we were familiar with. Verizon was, no doubt, pleased to add a GPS charge to my bill.

The road grew treacherously slippery, and the voice in my ear kept telling me to make a u-turn. And even when, at last, we arrived in sight of our home there was danger there too. The road was littered with police vehicles, five marked vehicles, one of them with a spotlight trained on a house across the street. We didn’t go look to see that the police had a spotlight on the back door, though you know they did. Very quietly, we unloaded the car and headed inside to feed the cats.

Far too late, I fell into bed, only to have the police bring in a paddy wagon with a megaphone at about 3 am, so My Angel and I could hear them (in English and Spanish) spend most of an hour talking two guys out of that house. “We have a warrant…we have permission to gas the house…come out with your hands up and nobody will get hurt…we don’t want to gas the house, please come out….”

Eventually, while I tried to get enough sleep to be professional and efficient at work, they succeeded in getting the two men to come out, and by the time I left for work the next day, everything looked perfectly normal and safe. I never heard what all that was about and I wonder, which realm is truly more mysterious?

Now, having returned from the real Windy City, I should get back to my alternate Windy City.  November is more than half over, and I have many words to go.

In other news, the editor liked the surprise collaboration story!  I'll share more details when I have them.  That, too, was a creative magical journey of sorts.

What magical things have you been involved in lately?
wyld_dandelyon: (Polychrome Wizard)
The photos here, as my friends here requested, are from my Dance of Leaves dress, which I was working on during the Tricky Pixie concert, which as I remember is where I left off in the story last night.

Eventually, as must always happen, the music ended and the lights brightened again. I had brought some of my own fairy gold (the chocolate sort), and gifted the performers after the Tricky Pixie concert. Dragon shared her artwork, and promised to send the original if we can get an address.

And then we headed off to feast our eyes on visual arts, our heads full of music.

Sadly, in the art show, I realized I had only one of the beautiful amethyst and quartz earrings I’d made still dangling from an ear. The other ear was sad and naked. We checked all the likely spots, in the process picking up a bit of cloth that had fallen from my appliqué project during the concert, and which must have been hidden under a chair before the denizens of that place rearranged the chairs—the concerts used a wall as backdrop, but the masquerade was to use the glass windows and doors on the side of the room instead, so when we returned to the same place a few minutes later, all the chairs had been magically moved.

Then My Angel fled to take a nap, as if a field of poppies had stolen all her energy. Dragon invited me to dinner, and we discovered that all the tables in the restaurant had been reserved. We were invited to wait in the bar for an hour. Dragon used words of power, and they admitted that yes, indeed, they could serve dinner in the bar as well. I challenged the restaurant to feed me safely, and they succeeded most elegantly, and the food (stuffed flounder for me and seafood risotto for Dragon) was delightful. So, reportedly, was the lobster ravioli we took back to My Angel. And I heard the dealers’ lament that during the Tricky Pixie concert no one was there to buy things but the other dealers. As Dragon said, everyone who was anyone was at the concert.

And then there was more music. I didn’t quite make it to the Ninjas’ concert, though I played music with them both the night before and the night after.

It may have been a fae blessing, or perhaps the simple mundane blessing of a government that banned cigarette smoking in hotels, but my voice got stronger all weekend, if you discount a few wobbles after 3 am. One of the handles to the bag holding my laptop came apart—but as I was bending to pick it up, so the laptop wasn’t jostled. I was able to tune the autoharp to itself by ear so I could do a request without spending a half hour on retuning every string.

After a modicum of sleep, while packing up to get out of the hotel, I found the missing earring, which had fallen into my sewing rather than wandering off to serve as an accidental toll for my passage.

Then, there was more music! I think the dead dog filk was possibly the best open filk this weekend, perhaps because everyone was relaxed, and no one had to worry about preparing for a concert or running off to a panel or event. Filkart ended up on the other side of the room, which was fine for the songs we do together that I have memorized. When he did a song where I needed to see the words, I borrowed the seat next to him, but soon stood up, since the fey magic, though strong, didn’t extend far enough to let me see through his guitar neck. And I even ended up playing guitar standing for two songs—something I haven’t done in ages. I was having so much fun, and despite mundane standards suggesting I’d had less sleep and should therefore be tireder than when I arrived, I felt energized.

Of course, finally, we had to head home. We set out to reverse the path we’d trod (well, driven). But Faerie didn’t want to let us go, and I finally had to resort to Modern Technology to start to banish the hold on our travels and let us return to paths we were familiar with. Verizon was, no doubt, pleased to add a GPS charge to my bill.

The road grew treacherously slippery, and the voice in my ear kept telling me to make a u-turn. And even when, at last, we arrived in sight of our home there was danger there too. The road was littered with police vehicles, five marked vehicles, one of them with a spotlight trained on a house across the street. We didn’t go look to see that the police had a spotlight on the back door, though you know they did. Very quietly, we unloaded the car and headed inside to feed the cats.

Far too late, I fell into bed, only to have the police bring in a paddy wagon with a megaphone at about 3 am, so My Angel and I could hear them (in English and Spanish) spend most of an hour talking two guys out of that house. “We have a warrant…we have permission to gas the house…come out with your hands up and nobody will get hurt…we don’t want to gas the house, please come out….”

Eventually, while I tried to get enough sleep to be professional and efficient at work, they succeeded in getting the two men to come out, and by the time I left for work the next day, everything looked perfectly normal and safe. I never heard what all that was about and I wonder, which realm is truly more mysterious?

Now, having returned from the real Windy City, I should get back to my alternate Windy City.  November is more than half over, and I have many words to go.

In other news, the editor liked the surprise collaboration story!  I'll share more details when I have them.  That, too, was a creative magical journey of sorts.

What magical things have you been involved in lately?

Duckon!

Jun. 21st, 2010 01:05 am
wyld_dandelyon: (Default)
:-D Work tomorrow. Good night.

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